Jan-Feb Reading Wrap-Up

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Some of the books I reviewed in January and February 

This year got off to a slow start reading wise but I certainly made up for that in February. I managed to get myself out of a long blogging slump, catch up on most of my outstanding book reviews from last year, and I have read some fabulous books.

On a personal level, the start of this year was a little bit insane. The bush fires affected almost all of us here in Australia in some way or another, and although the worst fires have mostly  been contained now, there is a long road to recovery ahead and issues to overcome.

I have also finally knuckled down and am writing a terrible first draft of the novel that has been knocking around inside my head for a good while now. I’m off to a good start so far and have come up with a good writing routine that is working for me, so fingers crossed it turns into a final draft some day!

Books I read in January

I only managed to read one book in January, but it was a corker! Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton is already an Aussie classic, and rightfully so. It’s a bit of tricky book to classify genre-wise, but just trust me, you need to read this one!

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Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton

Read my review 

Books I read in February

My next review, and first February, review was Love and Other Battles by Australian romance powerhouse Tess Woods. Love and Other Battles is a multi-generational family saga that moves between the Australian suburbs, the Vietnam Wars, and the bright lights of Nashville.

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Love and Other Battles by Tess Woods

Read my review

The Van Apfel Girls are Gone by Felicity McLean is another great Aussie novel: a bit a a Gothic mystery set in the 90s.

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The Van Apfel Girls are Gone by Felicity McLean

Read my Review 

Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe was my first non-fiction read of the year and I recommend this  book, or its children’s counterpart Dark Emu, to everyone in Australia. Dark Emu challenges the idea that Aboriginal Australians were only hunter-gatherers before colonisation and provides compelling evidence for this argument. A must read!

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Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe

Read my review 

The Accusation by Wendy James is a gripping Aussie thriller that had me guessing until the very end.

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The Accusation by Wendy James

Read my review 

I ran a giveaway for the hilarious So Lucky by Dawn O’Porter. I loved hearing about everybody’s favourite love stories and hope Melanie, the randomly chosen winner, enjoys her new book!

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So Lucky by Dawn O’Porter

Read my review

Postscript by Cecelia Ahern is the long awaited sequel to PS I Love You. I thought it was a lovely sequel to such a well-loved book and movie, not an easy task to accomplish, but it was very well done.

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Postcript by Cecelia AhernRead my review

My final book review for February was The Good Turn by Dervla McTiernan. This is the third book of the Irish Detective Cormac Reilly series and I think it might be the best one yet. This series if perfect for you if you love character driven crime fiction and gritty Irish detectives whose accent you can hear while reading.

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The Good Turn by Dervla McTiernan

What’s Coming up in March?

I am planning to keep up my reading and writing routines, so look out for some fabulous new book reviews over the next month.

I don’t want to tie myself down too much, but if you take a look at the bookshelf in my main photo you might be able to spy some of the books I will be reading soon in the background.

I’m currently reading and loving The Mothers by Genevieve Gannon, so you should be seeing a review for that very soon!

 

Book Review: Love and Other Battles by Tess Woods

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Love and Other Battles by Tess Woods

“Three generations of women.

Three heartbreaking choices.

One unforgettable story.”

CW: Love and Other Battles deals with issues of self-harm and suicide. Please contact your local support lines if required.

My Review

Love and Other Battles by Tess Woods spans across three generations of women, each one faced with her own heartbreaking decisions. This story will take you from the horrors faced by Jess during the Vietnam war in 1969, her daughter Jamie’s brush with a wild musician in 1989, and her teenage daughter CJ’s infatuation with the cool new boy in school in 2017.

I actually read this book last year, so you may remember me shouting about it a while ago. I absolutely loved this story just as much as I have a loved every single one of Tess Woods’ beautiful novels. She really excels at exploring difficult and messy subjects sensitively. I was spell bound by this book and fell in love with all of the characters, although I think I have a bit of a soft spot for Jess, the free-spirited hippie who was an unwilling victim of the Vietnam War.

5 stars!

Synopsis

1969: Free-spirited hippie Jess James has no intention of falling for a soldier … but perhaps some things are not in our power to stop.

1989: Jess’s daughter, Jamie, dreams of a simple life – marriage, children, stability – then she meets a struggling musician and suddenly the future becomes wilder and complex.

2017: When Jamie’s daughter, CJ, brings home trouble in the form of the coolest boy at school, the worlds of these three women turn upside down … and the past returns to haunt them.

Spanning the trauma of the Vietnam War to the bright lights of Nashville, the epidemic of teenage self-harm to the tragedy of incurable illness, Love and Other Battles is the heart-wrenching story of three generations of Australian women, who learn that true love is not always where you seek it.

If you loved The Notebook, this is a novel for you.

Details

Author: Tess Woods

Published:  June 17th 2019 by HarperCollins – AU

Source: Publisher

Read: Paperback, 336 pages, 2019

Goodreads

Amazon AU

Amazon US

Amazon UK