Book Review: SENSE AND SENSIBILITY by Jane Austen

I’ve been hoarding my beautiful Vintage Classic edition of SENSE AND SENSIBILITY for some time, so I was excited to make the time to revisit an old favourite during my month of selfish reading.

I was giving the gentlest of nudges to hurry up and get reading by the brilliant author of THE GIRL ON THE PAGE, John Purcell, who reminded me of the universality of Jane Austen’s novels in his bestselling debut. We have since bonded on Twitter over our mutual agreement that there is no problem in the world that can’t be made better by curling up my favourite classic author.

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SENSE AND SENSIBILITY by Jane Austen

“I do not attempt to deny,” said she, “that I think very highly of him – that I greatly esteem, that I like him.”

Paperback, 444 pages

Published: June 26th 2014 by Vintage Classics (first published October 30th 1811)

Original Title: Sense and Sensibility

ISBN: 0099589346 (ISBN13: 9780099589341)

Goodreads

“Elinor is as prudent as her sister Marianne is impetuous. Each must learn from the other after they are they are forced by their father’s death to leave their home and enter into the contests of polite society. The charms of unsuitable men and the schemes of rival ladies mean that their paths to success are thwart with disappointment but together they attempt to find a way to happiness.”

 

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It’s been years since I read SENSE AND SENSIBILITY, or any of Jane Austen’s novels, and it felt just like catching up with a good friend. Austen’s debut novel tells the story of two sisters, Marianne and Elinor Dashwood, who are about as  different as two sisters can be.

Marianne is the youngest and has the very strong opinions commonly found in teenagers. She is convinced that her future husband will love all the same things as she does, will sweep her off her feet in a whirlwind romance, and that it is only possible to truly love one person.

Elinor is far more sensible and spends a great deal of her time making excuses for Marianne’s rudeness to potential beaux and well-meaning neighbours alike.

The novel begins when Mr Dashwood’s death means that the girls and their mother are forced to leave their home to allow their elder half brother and his greedy wife to move in. This reflects Austen’s own life, as she was also forced to move due to unfavourable inheritances.

Marianne finds romance with the charming Willoughby, while scorning the elder and far more steady Colonel Brandon. Elinor is left wondering if her romance with her sister in law’s brother, Edward Ferrars, was all she thought it was when she encounters a rival she never knew existed.

As always, I thoroughly enjoyed reading SENSE AND SENSIBILITY. Even though this was Austen’s very first novel, it is a delightful read. I couldn’t help but think on this reading that a lot of the problems he characters went through were very British and could have been solved with a little bit of straight talking, but their polite inability to say what they really think is one of the reasons the rest of the world loves the British so much.

5 stars!

 

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My Favourite Books

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I have recently signed up an account over at Goodreads which is an awesome social media network for all book lovers. Get yourself over there if you haven’t already! One of the first things I needed to do was let them know my favourite books so that they could automatically generate recommendations for me based on those. Well that’s a tough question for a Scatterbooker like me,  but I have managed to come up with a short but definitely not comprehensive list.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll,

The Power of One by Bryce Courtney,

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee,

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald,

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen,

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë ,

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger,

Bridget Jone’s Diary by Helen Fielding,

The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory,

The Pact by Jodi Picoult,

The Kay Scarpetta Series by Patricia Cornwell,

1984 by George Orwell

It by Stephen King.

Over at Goodreads I have also joined the Aussie Readers group. It is full of very friendly Australian readers who have some brilliant book suggestions and they run seasonal reading challenges that everyone can join in with. I definitely recommend that any Australian readers head over and say hello to the lovely people over there.

I have decided to take part in the Aussie Readers December Challenge which is to read as many Christmas or New Year themed books as possible during December. So far I have decided to read:

The Perfect Christmas by Kate Forster

Yours for Christmas by Susan Mallery

Come Home for Christmas, Cowboy by Megan Crane

Also on my current reading list are:

Gray Mountain by John Grisham

I am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes

Explicit Detail by Scarlett Finn

I will also need to be offline for around two weeks starting from Tuesday 25th of November. I have created Scatterbooker as part of an assignment for one of my university subjects at Curtin University. So that means that while the assignment is being marked I won’t be able to make changes to https://scatterbooker.wordpress.com/ or any of my social media accounts. I’m going to miss all of you so much while I am offline, but I will use the time away to work on getting some of these book reviews ready to post as soon as my assignment is graded. While I am in exile you can still contact me at scatterbooker@gmail. I would love to hear about your favourite books or any Christmas/New Year themed books that you love.

 

Image adapted from an image that was uploaded by FutUndBeidl (2012) which was sourced via Flickr and I’m am sharing under the Creative Commons License. Visit here to view the original image.