How Emcee Kerser topped the Australian Aria Charts Through the Power of Social Media

 

kerser
Emcee Kerser

 

Australian rapper, Emcee Kerser, pulled off an amazing feat recently. His latest album, Next Step, recently topped the Australian Aria charts ahead of stars such as Kylie Minogue and Justin Bieber. It is currently sitting at number 26. This is even more amazing when you consider that Next Step has had no radio play on any mainstream stations. Kerser has built his career solely through social media channels.

Kerser’s approach reminds me of Kevin Kelly’s 1000 True Fans theory I wrote about a couple of weeks ago. Just like Andy Weir, Kerser uses his social media channels do much more than post song or book links. He sees interaction with his fans as being the key to his success.

In a recent news.com.au interview Kerser gave some advice for musicians on how to get ahead, but with a few tweaks this can easily be applied to all artists:

Set up a YouTube, Facebook and Instagram, and make sure fans know where to find them

Never be restricted and stay true to yourself

Have a thick skin and don’t let the haters get to you

Stay relevant

Be consistent, but make sure you are dropping quality with the quantity

A lot of you might be wondering how you can apply this to your own social media strategies. You certainly shouldn’t behave exactly the same as Kerser unless you happen to also be an Australian rapper. You can’t be the same as Andy Weir either unless you’re a massive space nerd. My advice is to spend some time to think about what you’re interested in and how that relates to your own work. Spend some time to find out what your audience is interested in too and schedule time each week to chat to people on your social media channels. Most importantly though, keep writing. The number one thing that most audiences want from their favourite author is more books!

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How You Might Be Able To Turn Your Self-Published Novel Into A Best-Seller

The Martian
The Martian by Andy Weir                

The newest space film to hit the cinemas, The Martian, which is directed by Ridley Scott and stars Matt Damon, seems like any other run of the mill Hollywood blockbuster at first glance. I was very surprised to read in the Sydney Morning Herald that The Martian started out as a humble blog, became a self-published novel, and gained a publishing and film deal in the space of 18 months.

It sounds like an impossible dream for most self-published authors, doesn’t it? Well, it maybe it is, but it’s not all doom and gloom. There are still ways for authors to make a comfortable living from their writing and the easiest way to go about it may result in a hit, just like The Martian.

Kevin Kelly argues that anyone who produces works of art only needs 1000 True Fans to make a living. The actual number of fans required for each artist is different, but the basic idea is that if you have enough True Fans who will buy every book that you ever publish and champion everything that you ever do you can still make a decent salary from writing without becoming a best-seller.

So, how do you find True Fans? By communicating with them! When Andy Weir first began writing The Martian he had around 3000 fans on his personal blog. Since Weir is a self-confessed space nerd and wrote about scientific space stuff his blog attracted other space nerds. Some of his fans helped with the scientific facts which helped make the novel as accurate as possible. A lot of Weir’s fans said they wanted to read The Martian on Kindle rather than online, so he published it on Amazon for them. In turn, they purchased the book and told everyone how much they enjoyed it. This buzz around the novel, which was initiated by Weir’s True Fans, helped it to become a best-seller on Amazon and attracted the attention of Random House and Fox. In other words, Weir found his True Fans and gave them what they wanted.

By connecting with his True Fans Andy Weir became a millionaire. Your True Fans will only be a small percentage of your actual fan base, but they are the people who you should focus the majority of your online and social media efforts on. These are the people who will honestly tell what was great or how you can make improvements. They will provide you with endless encouragement and support while singing your praises to everyone they know. Your True Fans will do everything in their power to make your latest novel a best-seller, but until then, connecting with them will inspire you to keep on writing and provide you with a comfortable living. Make sure you remember to make time for them.

Editing to add that the first step to writing a best-seller is to write a very good book and to focus on your writing as your number one priority. That’s always step one as the very clever author, Terry Tyler, pointed out. Then you can focus on social media and marketing.

This post was originally posted as a page. I have decided to edit and repost Self-Publishing Talk as standard blog posts.

So, Why Should You Be Interested in Self-Publishing?

Source: Maria Elena https://www.flickr.com/photos/melenita/9689712379
Source: Maria Elena https://www.flickr.com/photos/melenita/9689712379

The publishing industry has shifted from a one-sided form of communication that was dictated by the mainstream media to one where almost anybody can participate. Book culture is now a participatory culture and this means that anybody who reads, writes, or publishes books is experiencing these changes in some form.

 Changes to reading books

The two biggest changes are obviously E-books and online book retailers like Amazon. With E-readers we now have the technology to store an almost infinite amount of books and we can take them with us anywhere we go. Online book retailers allow us to purchase almost any book we like with the click of one button and are able to deliver it to our devices instantly. Readers will never have to worry about running out of books again!

Along with an increase in the choice of books comes the problem of deciding which books to read. The rise of book blogs and ratings platforms such as Goodreads solves the issue of choice by allowing readers to take advantage of the Collective Intelligence of all members to help them decide whether a book is worth reading.

Now readers are also able to participate in the conversation about the books they read. Any time that you ‘like’, ‘tweet’, review, or post about a book you are adding to the story around it. Instead of a Read Only Culture book culture is now a Read/Write Culture.

Changes to writing books

Self-publishing has made it much easier for authors to get their books out there. Writers now have much more control over their books and a greater share of their book sales but now have to take care of things such as marketing, copyright laws, cover designs, editing and proof-reading. I cannot stress how vital professional editing and proof-reading are for self-publishers! Betty Sargent explains why all self-published authors need a good editor at Publisher’s Weekly, a fantastic resource for authors.

There is now also the expectation that authors need to have an online presence and actively engage with their readers. How active you choose to be on social media is a personal choice but it is worth pointing out that even well-established best sellers such as Stephen King, J.K Rowling, and Anne M. Martin are active on Twitter.

 Changes to publishing books

The increase of self-publishing has led to more competition for traditional publishing houses, but there are also some benefits. Publishing, marketing, and distribution costs are much lower now than they were previously and the Internet has opened up opportunities for publishers to reach a global market. There is also a lot more opportunities for professional editors and proof-readers to work on a freelance basis.

This is just a short list of the recent changes to book culture which have been brought about by Digitization and Convergence. I aim to use Self-Publishing Talk as a forum to discuss these changes in the context of my Internet Communications studies and hopefully offer some useful advice and thought provoking ideas for authors, readers and publishers.

This post was originally posted as a page. I have decided to edit and repost Self-Publishing Talk as standard blog posts.

 

So, Why Am I So Interested In Self-Publishing?

Source: Maria Elena https://www.flickr.com/photos/melenita/9689712379
Source: Maria Elena https://www.flickr.com/photos/melenita/9689712379

Before I began my book blog I didn’t know much about the self-publishing industry at all. When I first began my great love affair with books, reading such classics as The Babysitter’s Club  and Sweet Valley High, there was only one way to read them. This meant that I never had enough new books because I got through them before my parents were prepared to take me to the shops or library for a new one.

While I was growing up, though, the world was starting change. Throughout my teens and twenties the world was rapidly becoming more and more digitized each year until the point that we’re at right now, in 2015, where almost any form of entertainment that you can possibly imagine, including books, is available online.

I am now a student of Internet Communications and over the course of my studies we talk a lot about the effects that digitization and also convergence have had on many different industries. A very clever man called Henry Jenkins describes what convergence means best, so I will let him explain it to you.

By convergence, I mean the flow of content across multiple media platforms, the cooperation between multiple media industries, and the migratory behavior of media audiences who would go almost anywhere in search of the kinds of entertainment experiences they wanted. Convergence is a word that manages to describe technological, industrial, cultural, and social changes, depending on who’s speaking and what they think they are talking about. In the world of media convergence, every important story gets told, every brand gets sold, every consumer gets courted across multiple media platforms. Right now, convergence culture is getting defined top-down by decisions being made in corporate boardrooms and bottom-up by decisions made in teenagers’ bedrooms. It is shaped by the desires of media conglomerates to expand their empires across multiple platforms and by the desires of consumers to have the media they want where they want it, when they want it, and in the format they want…. – See more at: http://henryjenkins.org/2006/06/welcome_to_convergence_culture.html#sthash.Mc0bZbpa.dpuf

I’ve read many interesting and informative articles and participated in many lectures about the effects of digitization and convergence on the television, film, and gaming industries, but there really isn’t much out there about the publishing industry. And when self-publishing gets mentioned, most people’s impression is that all self-published novels are terrible, full of typos and unprofessional, a legacy from when the only option for self-publishing was through a Vanity Press.

I may have even believed the same thing myself if I wasn’t lucky enough to have stumbled upon so many fabulous self-published authors this year! I have to admit that some of the self-published novels that I’ve read have been pretty terrible, but this is the case in any participatory culture. Just because everybody is able to be an author doesn’t mean that everybody should be an author, but I have also discovered an increasing amount of absolutely amazing self-published authors who go to an incredible amount of effort to publish their books. In fact, two of my favourite books that I’ve read this year, Kings and Queens by Terry Tyler  and Concealment  by Rose Edmunds, are self-published.

So, I’m going to use Self-Publishing Talk as a space to discuss my thoughts on digitization and convergence and the ways that writing, distributing and consuming books are changing. I’d love to hear your thoughts and you can check out my latest book reviews, including some great self-published novels, on the main blog page.

This post was originally posted as a page. I have decided to edit and repost Self-Publishing Talk as standard blog posts.

 

Self-Publishing Talk

jadeThis section is dedicated to discuss the self-publishing industry. Digitization and Convergence have had an enormous impact on the entertainment industries, but most of the academic research is focused on the television, film, and gaming industries. As an avid reader, book blogger, and student of Internet Communications, I am fascinated by the ways that the production, distribution, and consumption of books are changing and the current state of the self-publishing industry. Self-Publishing Talk is an outlet to combine three of my greatest passions in the one place.

This post was originally posted as a page. I have decided to edit and repost Self-Publishing Talk as standard blog posts.

 

How You Might Be Able To Turn Your Self-Published Novel Into A Best-Seller

Source: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18007564-the-martian?from_search=true&search_version=service
Source: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18007564-the-martian?from_search=true&search_version=service

The newest space film to hit the cinemas, The Martian, which is directed by Ridley Scott and stars Matt Damon, seems like any other run of the mill Hollywood blockbuster at first glance. So I was very surprised to read in the Sydney Morning Herald that The Martian started out as a humble blog, became a self-published novel, and gained a publishing and film deal in the space of 18 months.

It sounds like an impossible dream for most self-published authors, doesn’t it? Well, it probably is, but it’s not all doom and gloom. There are still ways for authors to make a comfortable living from their writing and the easiest way to go about it may result in a hit, just like The Martian…

Read more at https://scatterbooker.wordpress.com/self-publishing-talk/how-you-might-be-able-to-turn-your-self-published-novel-into-a-best-seller/

So, Why Should You Be Interested In Self-Publishing?

Source: Maria Elena https://www.flickr.com/photos/melenita/9689712379
Source: Maria Elena https://www.flickr.com/photos/melenita/9689712379

The publishing industry has shifted from a one-sided form of communication that was dictated by the mainstream media to one where almost anybody can participate. Book culture is now a participatory culture and this means that anybody who reads, writes, or publishes books is experiencing these changes in some form….

Read more at https://scatterbooker.wordpress.com/self-publishing-talk/so-why-should-you-be-interested-in-self-publishing/