#BookReview THE LOST FLOWERS OF ALICE HART by Holly Ringland @hollyringland @HarperCollinsAU

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THE LOST FLOWERS OF ALICE HART by Holly Ringland

Goodreads Blurb

The most enchanting debut novel of 2018, this is an irresistible, deeply moving and romantic story of a young girl, daughter of an abusive father, who has to learn the hard way that she can break the patterns of the past, live on her own terms and find her own strength.

After her family suffers a tragedy when she is nine years old, Alice Hart is forced to leave her idyllic seaside home. She is taken in by her estranged grandmother, June, a flower farmer who raises Alice on the language of Australian native flowers, a way to say the things that are too hard to speak. But Alice also learns that there are secrets within secrets about her past. Under the watchful eye of June and The Flowers, women who run the farm, Alice grows up. But an unexpected betrayal sends her reeling, and she flees to the dramatically beautiful central Australian desert. Alice thinks she has found solace, until she falls in love with Dylan, a charismatic and ultimately dangerous man.

The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart is a story about stories: those we inherit, those we select to define us, and those we decide to hide. It is a novel about the secrets we keep and how they haunt us, and the stories we tell ourselves in order to survive. Spanning twenty years, set between the lush sugar cane fields by the sea, a native Australian flower farm, and a celestial crater in the central desert, Alice must go on a journey to discover that the most powerful story she will ever possess is her own.

My Review 

THE LOST FLOWERS OF ALICE HART is a haunting tale of family secrets, betrayal, and how the stories of the past impact the future.

Alice Hart grows up with an abusive father and downtrodden mother who still does her best to protect her daughter and teach her the language of native Australian flowers that she had learned from her mother in law. When tragedy strikes Alice is taken in by her grandmother, June. June is a flower farmer who takes in women doing it tough and caretaker of the language of flowers created by her ancestors and their family history. When Alice takes of to the Australian desert where she discovers that she is doomed to repeat the tragic history of her past unless she is able to come to terms with her own story.

I loved the language of Australian native flowers that Ringland created to tell this story. Each chapter begins with a description of a different native flower and what it means in the language created by Alice’s family. THE LOST FLOWERS OF ALICE HART is a brilliantly crafted debut novel that will definitely appeal to a wide audience.

*Thank you HarperCollins Publishers for sending me a copy to review.

About the Author

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Holly Ringland

HOLLY RINGLAND grew up barefoot and wild in her mother’s tropical garden on the east coast of Australia. Her interest in cultures and stories was sparked by a two-year journey her family took in North America when she was nine years old, living in a camper van and travelling from one national park to another. In her twenties, Holly worked for four years in a remote Indigenous community in the central Australian desert. Moving to England in 2009, Holly obtained her MA in Creative Writing from the University of Manchester. Her essays and short fiction have been published in various anthologies and literary journals. She now lives between the UK and Australia. To any question ever asked of Holly about growing up, writing has always been the answer.

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#BookReview UK2 (Project Renova #3) by Terry Tyler @TerryTyler4

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UK2 by Terry Tyler, featuring Ziggy

Goodreads Blurb

‘Two decades of social media had prepared them well for UK2.’

The pace steps up in this final instalment of the Project Renova trilogy, as the survivors’ way of life comes under threat.

Two years after the viral outbreak, representatives from UK Central arrive at Lindisfarne to tell the islanders about the shiny new city being created down south. Uk2 governor Verlander’s plan is simple: all independent communities are to be dissolved, their inhabitants to reside in approved colonies. Alas, those who relocate soon suspect that the promises of a bright tomorrow are nothing but smoke and mirrors, as great opportunities turn into broken dreams, and dangerous journeys provide the only hope of freedom.

Meanwhile, far away in the southern hemisphere, a new terror is gathering momentum…

‘I walked through that grey afternoon, past fields that nobody had tended for nearly three years, past broken down, rusty old vehicles, buildings with smashed windows. I was walking alone at the end of the world, but I was a happy man. I was free, at last.’

Although this concludes the Project Renova trilogy, there will be more books in the series. A collection of five side stories is planned, and another novel, set far into the future.

My Review

UK2 is the gripping third installment of the post-apocalyptic Project Renova series. I liked it even more that the ending left plenty of room for more stories from this world, because I am hooked!

UK2 picks up after the world is almost wiped out by a virus and most of the main characters from the beginning of the series have settled on a small remote island, Lindisfarne, in the UK. The group on Lindisfarne have long since grown accustomed to living on the island, free of electricity, social media, money, and all the trappings of modern day society. They have already weathered plenty of tragedy and have settled into their new way of life, although it is obvious they will constantly have obstacles to overcome in the future.

Doyle has quickly become disenfranchised with the new UK (UK2) which has been set up by the slimy Alex Verlander from Project Renova. It’s clear to Doyle that the people in charge don’t have the people’s best interests at heart, but he has no choice but to travel to Lindisfarne to recruit the inhabitants to come to UK2.

I loved the character development from Tipping Point to UK2. By the end of this novel it was clear that all of the main characters had undergone some serious personality changes due to the crazy experiences they’d gone through. Some had grown far stronger than they had ever been before the virus hit and others had gone completely bonkers. The use of multiple point of view chapters illustrated these character changes perfectly.

You can check out my reviews of the first two novels in the Project Renova series: Tipping Point and Lindisfarne

About the Author

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Terry Tyler

@TerryTyler4 on Twitter… I am a writer, with 17 books on Amazon. I’m obsessed with The Walking Dead and all things post apocalyptic, also love South Park, Game of Thrones, autumn and winter, history, and most books/films/TV series to do with war/battles/gangsters. I’m a vegan who falls off the wagon now and again. Live in the north east of England with my husband, who I love even more than Daryl Dixo

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#BookReview THOSE OTHER WOMEN by Nicola Moriarty @NikkiM3

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THOSE OTHER WOMEN by Nicola Moriarty featuring Zeus and Ziggy

Goodreads

From the author of The Fifth Letter comes a controversial and darkly comic story about the frustrations of being a childless woman in the modern baby-obsessed world… .

Poppy’s world has been tipped sideways: the husband who never wanted children has betrayed her with her broody best friend.

At least Annalise is on her side. Her new friend is determined to celebrate their freedom from kids, so together they create a Facebook group to meet up with like-minded women, and perhaps vent just an little about smug mummies’ privileges at work.

Meanwhile, their colleague Frankie would love a night out, away from her darlings – she’s not had one this decade and she’s heartily sick of being judged by women at the office as well as stay-at-home mums.

Then Poppy and Annalise’s group takes on a life of its own and frustrated members start confronting mums like Frankie in the real world. Cafés become battlegrounds, playgrounds become war zones and offices have never been so divided.

A rivalry that was once harmless fun is spiraling out of control.

Because one of their members is a wolf in sheep’s clothing. And she has an agenda of her own . . .

My Review 

THOSE OTHER WOMEN is a funny read that explores the complexities of female friendships and rivalries.

I think any woman will find themselves nodding along to this novel at some points, but I hope they will also gain a clearer understanding of the other side.

Poppy’s husband has left her for her best friend. To add insult to injury they are having a baby together when Poppy had thought they were both happy to remain childless. She teams up with her single and child-free work friend, Annalise, to complain about how easy they think it is for mums. Their colleague, Frankie, always seems to be able to get out of work whenever she likes and there is even a local mums group on Facebook that won’t  let single women join. Poppy and Annalise start their own Facebook group for local single women, but things quickly move from companionship and the occasional vent to real-life confrontations and it becomes obvious that somebody in Poppy and Annalise’s group isn’t who she says she is.

THOSE OTHER WOMEN explores the the ways that women can so often be so harsh and judgmental towards themselves, and each other, and the ways that social media can often make these situations so much worse than they need to be.

As a childless woman in my 30s I have definitely felt very uncomfortable about that and been excluded by some women, and I would say I’ve probably unintentionally done the same to some women with kids myself. Like Moriarty demonstrates by the end of the novel, both groups have their own challenges and some bits about our lives that are also pretty fantastic. We really should be more open minded about other people’s life choices and talk to each other in person, rather than letting things fester and get blown out of proportion on social media.

I really love the research by danah boyd who explores how young people use social media for anybody who is interested in doing further reading about the methods and psychology of bullying via social media. It can often be far more insidious and hurtful than real-life bullying and danah’s research would be incredibly insightful for parents of teenagers so they can have a clearer understanding of some of the warning signs to look out for.

About the Author

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Nicola Moriarty

Nicola lives in Sydney’s north west with her husband and two small (but remarkably strong willed) daughters. In between various career changes, becoming a mum and studying at Macquarie University, she began to write. Now, she can’t seem to stop.

Her writing was once referred to as ‘inept’ by The Melbourne Age. Luckily on that same day the Brisbane Courier Mail called her work ‘accomplished, edgy and real.’ So she stopped crying into her Weetbix, picked up a pen and continued to write. She has been fueled by a desire to prove The Age wrong ever since.

These days, she writes everything from novels to football stadium announcements to VW radio ad scripts and Home Loan EDMs to the occasional Mamamia article and the odd Real Estate advert.

Her first two novels, Free-Falling and Paper Chains were published by Random House Australia in 2012 and 2013. Free-Falling was translated into Dutch and German and was awarded the title of ‘Best Australian Debut’ from Chicklit Club. Paper Chains was later picked up for publishing in the U.S. by HarperCollins and will be released there in 2019.

Her romance novella Captivation was released both as an e-book and in print as part of a collection of romance stories titled, All My Love. She has since concluded that romance writing is not her thing. She also wrote two travel themed short stories for the U.K. Sunlounger anthologies, which were Amazon bestsellers.

While completing a BA with a major in writing at Macquarie University, she was awarded the Fred Rush Convocation prize for creative writing / literary criticism in Australian literature. This achievement made her glow with pride and happily took some of the sting out of The Age’s aforementioned criticism.

In 2017, Nicola released her third novel, The Fifth Letter. Published by HarperCollins in both Australia and the U.S. and by Penguin in the U.K, it was a top ten best seller in Australia and just snuck onto the USA Today Best seller list! It was translated into German, Dutch and Hungarian. In exciting news, film rights for The Fifth Letter were also optioned by Universal Cable Productions.

Nicola’s latest novel, Those Other Women was released in Australia, the US and the UK in 2018 and was an Amazon best seller. Marian Keyes had this to say about Those Other Women, ‘I devoured it, loved it and totally escaped into it … Fun and topical.’

She has four older sisters and one older brother and she lives in constant fear of being directly compared to her two wildly successful and extraordinarily talented author sisters, Liane Moriarty and Jaclyn Moriarty. Unless of course, the comparison is something kind, perhaps along the lines of, “Liane, Jaci and Nicola are all wonderful writers. I love all of their books equally.”

Other things of note are Nicola’s lack of fine motor skills, demonstrated by her inability to thread keys onto key-rings, tie balloons, braid hair and apply eyeliner. If you have taken the time to read this far, she would very much like to send you a Freddo Frog to show her appreciation. But she probably won’t follow through, because she’ll most likely eat all the Freddo Frogs before she gets the chance to post them. Sorry, she does mean well.

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#BookReview ‘P is for Pearl’ by Eliza Henry-Jones @ehenryjones

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P is for Pearl by Eliza Henry-Jones

Goodreads Blurb

From the talented author of the celebrated novels In the Quiet and Ache comes a poignant and moving book that explores the stories we tell ourselves about our families, and what it means to belong.

Seventeen-year-old Gwendolyn P. Pearson has become very good at not thinking about the awful things that have happened to her family. She has also become used to people talking about her dead mum. Or not talking about her and just looking at Gwen sympathetically. And it’s easy not to think about awful things when there are wild beaches to run along, best friends Loretta and Gordon to hang out with – and a stepbrother to take revenge on.

But following a strange disturbance at the cafe where she works, Gwen is forced to confront what happened to her family all those years ago. And she slowly comes to realise that people aren’t as they first appear and that like her, everyone has a story to tell.

‘P is for Pearl is a complex, authentic exploration of grief, friendship, mental illness, family and love, sensitively written by a writer whose voice will resonate with teen readers.’ – Books+Publishing

My Review

Nobody writes about grief and trauma like Eliza Henry-Jones. With qualifications English, Psychology and grief, loss and trauma counselling Henry-Jones knows her stuff, but I think her writing skills transcend the basic knowledge she has gained. Every novel by this author seems to get right to the heart and soul of her characters and I am always able to relate to her characters almost as though she is writing about my own personal experiences.

P is for Pearl only really fits into the YA genre because the main characters are in high school, but readers of any age will relate to Gwendolyn’s story and her battle to unravel the mysteries of the past so that she can move on and heal her wounds. I know it seems strange to enjoy novels about grief and trauma, but Henry-Jones is so good at it. I found it remarkable to learn that the author wrote the first draft of this novel while she was in high school!

Book #Review: ‘Lindisfarne’ by Terry Tyler @terrytyler4

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Lindisfarne by Terry Tyler

Goodreads blurb

Sequel to Tipping Point, Project Renova Book 1

Six months after the viral outbreak, civilised society in the UK has broken down. Vicky and her group travel to the Northumbrian island of Lindisfarne, where they are welcomed by an existing community.

New relationships are formed, old ones renewed. The lucky survivors adapt, finding strength they didn’t know they possessed, but the honeymoon period does not last long. Some cannot accept that the rules have changed, and, for just a few, the opportunity to seize power is too great to pass up. Egos clash, and the islanders soon discover that there are greater dangers than not having enough to eat.

Meanwhile, in the south, Brian Doyle discovers that rebuilding is taking place in the middle of the devastated countryside. He comes face to face with Alex Verlander from Renova Workforce Liaison, who makes him an offer he can’t refuse. But is UK 2.0 a world in which he will want to live?

Lindisfarne is Book 2 in the Project Renova series.
A book of related short stories, entitled Patient Zero, features back and side-stories from minor characters, and should be available in November, 2017. Book 3 is due in mid 2018.

My Review

Lindisfarne is the  second book of the fascinating post-apocalyptic Project Renova series by  Terry Tyler. Lindisfarne picks up where Tipping Point left off with a mystery virus wreaking havoc across the UK and the rest of the world. Vicky and her group travel to a small remote island to start a new life where they meet up with a various of groups of with the same idea in mind. But forming a new society from the dregs of the old one isn’t easy for Vicky and the new occupants of Lindisfarne, and the same old power and ego struggles of the past rear their head and create problems. We also find out some more about Project Renova and how the virus was originally developed and spread through Brian Doyle’s experiences in the south.

I absolutely loved this book! Terry Tyler’s decision to write this series from multiple point of views really gives you a comprehensive insight into the perspective of all of the characters and the characters are mostly everyday kind of people.  This series really makes you wonder what would I do in a post-apocalyptic world?

Links

Find out more about the author and the Project Renova series at Terry Tyler’s website

Goodreads

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Amazon AU

Scatterbooker reviews ‘That Girl’ by Kate Kerrigan

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That Girl  by Kate Kerrigan

Goodreads Synopsis

You can escape a place. But you can’t escape yourself.

Hanna flees the scene of a terrible crime in her native Sligo. If she can just vanish, re-invent herself under a new name, perhaps the police won’t catch up with her. London seems the perfect place to disappear.

Lara has always loved Matthew and imagined happy married life in Dublin. Then comes the bombshell – Matthew says he wants to join the priesthood. Humiliated and broken-hearted, Lara heads to the most godless place she can find, King’s Road, Chelsea.

Matthew’s twin sister, Noreen, could not be more different from her brother. She does love fiance John, but she also craves sex, parties and fun. Swinging London has it all, but without John, Noreen is about to get way out of her depth.

All three girls find themselves working for Bobby Chevron – one of London’s most feared gangland bosses – and it’s not long before their new lives start to unravel.

 

My Review

‘That Girl’ is a romance with a twist, set in the fascinating world of London during the swinging sixties.

Three girls leave Ireland to start lives in London where they get caught up in the grimy underworld of the sleazy gangster,  Bobby Chevron where they discover that no matter how far you run your past will always catch up with you in the end.

Hanna is trying to escape from a horrifying crime, Lara is running away from a broken heart, while Noreen is looking for a final fling before she settles down to married life in her small Irish town. These three main characters were completely different, but they complemented each other perfectly. They all had their reasons for heading to London and dealt with the adversity they were faced with in different but equally strong ways. ‘That Girl’ really is a story of strong female characters getting stuff done no matter what.

I am a sucker for good historical fiction and Kate Kerrigan always does a brilliant job of setting the scene. I almost felt as though I was walking down King’s Street in its heyday and my feet were stuck to the floor of Bobby Chevron’s gangster nightclub. Five out of five stars!

Thank you Head of Zeus and Harper Collins Australia for providing me with a review copy.

Links

Kate Kerrigan

Amazon UK

Amazon US

Amazon AU

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Win a copy of The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

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The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

 

Goodreads Synopsis

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors.

Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare.

What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

My Review

A.J. Finn’s debut novel The Woman in the Window has had a lot of hype surrounding it, and rightly so. Finn’s first person narrated psychological thriller is written in a similar style to recent hit thrillers Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train, with a large nod to Alfred Hitchcock’s classic Rear Window. 

The Woman in the Window’s protagonist, Anna Fox, is a lot more grown up than the usual thriller protagonist. She’s a 38 year old former psychologist with agoraphobia who passes her time drinking wine, watching classic movies, and spying on her neighbours through the window of her New York apartment. 

When Anna sees something that doesn’t make any sense, and she can’t convince anybody to believe her, we are taken on a twisted journey that that will have you holding onto your seat until the final page. 

“Just remember: It isn’t paranoia if it’s really happening.” 

 

Giveaway

I have an extra copy of The Woman in the Window to giveaway to one lucky reader thanks to Harper Collins Books Australia. All you need to do to enter is let me know in the comment section or any of my social media pages what is your favourite classic movie?

I will randomly draw a winner Monday, March 5th, 2018.

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